All posts by pavithra

| | posted on:Multiple Disability

Center for Multiple Disability

multiple disability

Service to Humanity / Lodge Fellowship Early Intervention Centre for Multiple Disabled Children

After the grand success of Lodge Fellowship No. 140, Computerized Braille Language Laboratory at Ahmedabad, setting up a Center for Spinal Injuries at Bhuj in Gujarat after the devastating earthquake & The Lodge Fellowship Computerized Lab for The Hearing & Speech Impaired at Ahmedabad, it was the desire of the W.M. W.Bro. Ratan Vadvan & the brethren of Lodge Fellowship to undertake a new project, which would serve the Multiple Disabled Children. Along with The Blind People’s Association (BPA) which is one of the largest organizations working for all categories of disabilities all over India it was decided to set up this unique project which would be known as “Lodge Fellowship Early Development Centre for Multiple Disabled Children”. This new campus called the “SAMARPAN SANKOOL” has faculties specially designed for very young infants and toddlers with multiple disabilities.  These children will be assessed and helped to develop their abilities and grow as normally as possible through a multiple disciplinary team consisting of a Councilor, Special Educator, Physiotherapist, and Mobility Instructor etc. Objectives of The Center :

  1. To identify children at risk
  2. To identify children with congenital disabilities
  3. To provide early stimulation services to ensure age appropriate development
  4. To train parents to rear children with special needs
  5. To provide assistive devices to enhance the residual sensory abilities.
  6. To create an awareness among professions about rehabilitation services

Services: The project provides the following services.

  1. Early identification
  2. Clinical assessment
  3. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy
  4. Sensory stimulation
  5. Sensory integration
  6. Early communication development
  7. Alternative and Augmentative communication
  8. Self care skills
  9. Pre academic skills

For More Details :http://masonrymagic.org/lodge_fellowship/5_Service_to_humanity/center_for_multipal_disability.jsp

| | posted on:Hearing Impairment, Visual impairment

Aids for Visually Impairments & Hearing Impairments

hearing impairments

Aids for Visually Impairments

Sight & Sound

Suppliers of :

  • Ptosis spectacle
  • Rubber occluder for therapy
  • Occluding contact lenses for therapy
  • Pin hole contact lenses

C4F/216, Janakpuri,
New Delhi 110 058

Tel: 5599839

Sparsh Products

Manufacturers and suppliers of:

  • Popular board games adapted for the visually handicapped
  • Audible cricket ball
  • Audible flying discs
  • Braille alarm clock
  • Braille paper
  • Index braille printer from Sweden
  • Everest acoustic hood
  • Aria Palmtop talking computer
  • Columbus talking compass

151-5, Rajpur Road,
Dehradun 248 001

Tel: 135-685011
Fax: 135-651108/650944
Email: base@giasdl01.vsnl.net.in

Louis Braille Memorial Research Center

Manufacturers of:

  • Safety stylus with eraser
  • Notex (money handling machine)
  • Inland/envelope addressers
  • Ahuja Bhoomithi Sadhan (Geometry box)
  • Sathee cane
  • Beeper (Homing device)
  • Composite braille slate
  • Audible cricket ball
  • Audible weighing balance

Rustom Alapiwalla Complex,
124 Cotton Dept,
Cotton Green, Mumbai 400 033

Tel: 372 6748

Aids for Hearing Impairments

Arphi Electronic Pvt. Ltd.

Manufacturers of:

A range of high-power BTE hearing instruments with PC for most severe hearing loss

Prabhadevi Industrial Estate,
Veer Savarkar Marg,
Mumbai 400 025

Tel: 4220839/4222229/4309376
Fax: 4320690
Email: arphi@bom3.vsnl.net.in

Elkon Private Limited

Manufacturers of:

Auditory trainers

904, Majestic Chambers,
144,Girgaum Road,
Mumbai 400 004

Tel: 3887247/3885407
Fax: 3885819

Electronic Ears India

Distributors of:

  • Phonak Sono-Forte 332X AZ hearing aid for the severely hearing impaired
  • Phonak Pico-Forte PP-C-L for low frequency severe hearing loss
  • Phonak Pico-Forte PP-C for severe flat and sloping hearing loss
  • Phonak Pico-Forte C for moderate to severe hearing loss

K-9A, Kalkaji,
New Delhi 110 019

Tel: 6475127
Fax: 6475127

Electronic Ears India

Dtributors of:

  • Phonak Sono-Forte 332X AZ hearing aid for the severely hearing impaired
  • Phonak Pico-Forte PP-C-L for low frequency severe hearing loss
  • Phonak Pico-Forte PP-C for severe flat and sloping hearing loss
  • Phonak Pico-Forte C for moderate to severe hearing loss

K-9A, Kalkaji,
New Delhi 110 019

Tel: 6475127
Fax: 6475127

12, Rokadia Enclave,
Nanda Patkar Road,
Mumbai 400 057

Tel: 6149812
Fax: 6121413

Sight & Sound

Suppliers of:

  • Hearing aid cords
  • TV listening cord
  • Ear tips
  • Ear moulds
  • Ear phones: 2 pin
  • L-band
  • Collapsible tubing
  • Snap rings for ear moulds

C4F/216,
Janakpuri,  New Delhi 110 058

Tel: 5599839

| | posted on:Locomotor disability

Aids for Physical Impairments

Aid for physical impairment

Artificial Limbs Manufacturing Corporation of India, (A Government of India)

Manufacturers of :

  • Mobility aids & Writing aids
  • Lower extremity – orthotics
  • Cervical and Spinal braces
  • Upper extremity – Prosthetics
  • Lower extremity – Prosthetics

The General Manager (Marketing & Bilateral) Artificial Limbs Manufacturing Corporation of India
Grand Trunk Road
Kanpur 208016

Tel: 250172/250897
Fax: 0512-252617

Bhai Mahaveer Viklang Sahayata Samiti

Manufacturers of:

  • Jaipur foot/limbs
  • Jaipur above knee limb
  • Jaipuri below knee limb
  • Calipers

Swai Mansingh Hospital
Jaipur 302 004

Tel: 563063

L-43, Connaught Circus
New Delhi 100 001

Tel: 3323350
Fax: 91-11-3352446

Dhingra Surgicals

Manufacturers of:

  • Orthopedic appliances
  • Wheelchairs
  • Polio calipers
  • Shoe inserts
  • Artificial limbs

15/4, Choti Sabzi Mandi,
Janakpuri,
New Delhi 110 058

Tel: 5593042/5501627

Images & Scripts

Manufacturers of:

  • Wheelchair, folding, adult size

E-7, SMA Co-op Industrial Estate,
GT Karnal Road,
Delhi 110 033

Tel: 7428499
Fax: 91-11-7438499
Email: terra@sahaj.com

India Medico Instruments

Suppliers of:

  • Paraffin wax
  • Grip exerciser
  • Medicine ball
  • Tee bracket pulley set
  • Cervical traction
  • Lumbar traction
  • Static cycle exerciser
  • Rowing machine
  • Shoulder wheel
  • Crutches
  • Walking aids

2 & 3 Gurwallon ki Dharamshalla,
Angoori Bagh,
Delhi 110 001

Tel: 2517945/7293759

MP Industrial Corporation

Suppliers of:

  • Kinetic Honda 100 cc self starter hand controlled scooter
  • Kinetic Honda side wheel attachment
  • Bajaj M 80 hand kick auto rickshaw
  • Bajaj Sunny 60 cc Moped with hand kick start
  • Hero or Luna 50 cc Moped with pulley rope start/hand rod push drive

585, Bhagirathpura,
Indore 452 003

Tel: 423404/422260

Navchetan Orthopedic Appliances

Manufacturers of:

  • Heel pad compactor

Opp. ST Depot,
Jamnagar 36005, Gujarat

Tel: 77267

New Generation Ortho-Prosthetic

Manufacturers of:

  • Polypropylene functional braces
  • PVC splints
  • Floor reaxtion orthosis
  • Breast prosthesis
  • Modular artificial limbs
  • Walking calipers
  • Spinal braces
  • Crutches
  • Walkers

66-A, Street No, 2, Krishna Nagar,
Near Baba Balak Nath Mandir,
Safdarjung Enclave,
New Delhi 110 029

Tel: 6164999/6109773
Email: rjain@vsnl.net.in
Vimal.cpo.@hotmail.com

National Institute of Rehabilitation Training and Research (under the Ministry if Social Justice & Empowerment, Government of India)

Manufacturers of:

  • Modular below knee prosthesis

Olatpur, PO Bairoi,
District Cuttack 754 010,
Orissa

Narwal Orthopedic & Rehabilitation Aids

Manufacturers of:

  • Walking aids
  • Back supports
  • Pelvic traction kits and spares
  • Cervical aids
  • Cervical traction kits and spares
  • Abdominal supports
  • Wrist and elbow supports
  • Cock-up slints and forearm
  • Thumb and finger splints
  • Knee, calf and ankle supports
  • Foot and heel supports
  • Fracture aids
  • Foot, ankle traction kits and spares
  • Orthopedic shoes
  • Lower limb prosthesis
  • Upper limb prosthesis
  • Calipers

1340, Near Medical Mor,
Delhi Road, Rohtak 124 001

Tel: 01262-44914

Narwal Viklang Kendra,
Near Police Lane, Ashoka Colony,
Karnal, Haryana

Tel: 0184-255295

Surgical Electronics

Manufacturers of:

  • Lower limb prosthesis
  • Ankle foot orthosis polyproylene
  • Lower limb prosthesis
  • Upper limb orthosis
  • Upper limb prosthetics
  • Mobility aids
  • Walking frames
  • Prosthetic and orthrotic supplies

E-9, Sector 7,
NOIDA 201 301

Tel: 91-527202/522419
Fax: 535160

Surgico-Furn (India) Ltd

Manufacturers of:

  • Tricycle
  • Wheelchair fully reclining
  • Wheelchair fixed
  • Commode pot chairs
  • Wheelchair folding
  • Walkers

E 77/1 BSR Industrial Area,
Ghaziabad

Tel: 0575-702232
Fax: 0575-752627
Email: surgico_furn_ltd@hotmail.com

SAGE (Everest engineers)

Manufacturers of:

  • Wheelchairs
  • Walking aids
  • Commode chairs

184 – A, Peera Grahi,
Ramlila Park,
Delhi 110 041

Tel: 5587151
Fax: 5673476

Silipos, USA

Manufacturers of:

  • Foot drop splints
  • Artificial limbs
  • Heel cups

210, Ground Floor,
Malad Shopping Center,
SV Road, Malad (West), Mumbai 400 064

Tel: 022-8882270
Fax: 022-8897219
Email: pocl@bom3.vsnl.net.in

Technical Automotives

Manufacturers of:

  • Rajhans auto tribikes
  • Tricycle
  • Wheelchairs
  • Crutch axilla
  • Walking aids
  • Walking frames
  • Low cost calipers
  • Commode
  • Urine pot/bottle
  • Air ring

8/3 Old Ganga Bridge,
Unnao 209 001, Uttar Pradesh
Post Box No 460, Kanpur 208 001

Tel: 0512-825158/825539

The Spastics Society of India: National Job Development Center

Manufacturers of:

  • Wheelchairs for children, juniors and adults
  • Light foldable wheelchair
  • Mini wheelchair
  • Wheelchair with toilet facility
  • Rollator
  • Walker
  • Buggy
  • Reclining chair

Sion-Trombay Road, Chembur,
Mumbai 400 071

Tel: 5576815/5519413/5585267
Fax: 5566810/6436848

Vir Engineers

Manufacturers of:

  • Kinetic Honda 100 cc adapted motorcycles
  • Chetak 150 cc adapted motorcycles

145, Bharat Apartments,
Sector 13, Rohini,
Delhi 110 085

Tel: 7860991

| | posted on:Resources

How Can You Help When A Friend Or Family Member Becomes Disabled

How Can You Help When Somebody Becomes Disabled In Your Environment?

You can often hear that due to an accident or illness, somebody becomes disabled. The most frequent question I get from people is that somebody just recently became disabled in their family or circle of friends and they would like to help, but they are not sure how. Either because they don’t know what is the best thing to do, or they have an idea, but it appears to be very expensive.

three_wheeler_23_05_06_04_54747_435The first thing you can do is to understand what is help for the individual. Often times you can see people trying to help with their best intentions, but they end up causing more harm, because they haven’t researched what is the best way to help. This can be any number of things depending on the situation, most importantly what you should do is help your friend or family member to regain the independence he/she used to have.

These days, one of the most effective things to do is to help people use available technology, especially computers to compensate for their disability. First, understand how people with disabilities use the computer, or any other technologies. The first shock you will encounter is that it is extremely expensive. There are numerous funds to purchase technology, however, it is not always the most expensive solution that is able to help most effectively. These days relatively low-cost hardware and software are available to make a major difference. Much of it is mainstream technology, which you most likely already own. For example, when people injure their hands and they are not able to type, in an hour you can set up Microsoft Office with voice recognition.

There are many support groups and associations for people with different disabilities which you can turn to. They can offer practical assistance, as well as put you in touch with other people with similar disabilities. Support groups can help a great deal coping with the difficulties, and getting quick advice on useful equipments, training opportunities, or just about the altered life circumstances in general.

Many people refer to disabilities as different abilities. And it is absolutely true. These days social programs and technology are able to help people to integrate into society and gain the most possible independence. Many people, who live with a disability claim that it is not their disability which creates the most challenge in their lives, which was quite different several decades ago.

The aim of this post is not to give you an extensive resource list. Rather, to give you a couple of ideas when you just start researching this topic. However, if you are in need of resources, I will be happy to put you in touch with the right people or institutions.

| | posted on:Visual impairment

How Do Deaf Blind People Use The Computer

Things get more complex when a person has more than one disability. Let’s examine what happens when a person is both deaf and blind. The major difficulty in this case is that while blind people are mostly compensated by technology through sound, deaf blind people cannot take advantage of these solutions.iveo-demo

The easiest way for deaf blind people to interact with technology is by touch. All visual and audible information should be converted into tactile information.

Tactile information can be obtained from electronic textual information by the use of a Braille display. A Braille display works in conjunction with a screen reader, and what a screen reader normally announces, the Braille display prints it out with dynamic Braille letters on an equipment, which is usually located under the keyboard. This makes it easy for people to quickly switch between the keyboard and the Braille display. A Braille display can be anywhere from 12 to 84 characters long, in average they are capable of displaying 40 characters.

As one of the major steps, audible information should be transcribed into textual information, similarly to how it is done to make it accessible for deaf people.

The next step is to provide all accessibility solutions necessary for blind and visually impaired people. At this point, if all is done properly, we have everything converted into electronic, accessible text.

This text can now be easily accessed by using a screen reader. If you are not familiar with screen readers, read how blind people use the computer.

This solution, however, does not make technology accessible as effectively as it does for blind people in general. People who can read with their eyes can see several words at a time and are mostly able to read quite fast. People who read with their fingers can only feel approximately two letters with one finger. Some people who perfected Braille reading can read with at least four fingers, but in average blind people use only two fingers to read, the two index fingers, which means that they will feel approximately four characters at a time.

This makes reading much slower than it is for people who listen to the same screen reader through speech. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of the use of technology has to suffer because of it.

One way to compensate a little for the speed, different languages use Braille abbreviations which is somewhat similar to shorthand writing. The most frequented combinations of characters or words are replaced by fewer Braille characters which cannot be confused with anything else in context. For example, the word “Braille” is abbreviated as “brl”. Once people learn these abbreviations, reading could become exponentially faster.

Unfortunately it is very difficult to demonstrate this experience, as it requires a professional knowledge of the Braille alphabet. If similarly to previous exercises you turn off your speakers and close your eyes, you will surely experience the frustration, but not the experience of actually being able to work with the computer.

| | posted on:Resources

மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகளின் தமிழக  அரசின் நலத் திட்டம்

ARV_TN_BUDGET_69176f

மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகளின் நலனுக்காக முதல்வர் கருணாநிதியின் நேரடிப் பார்வையில் தனித்துறை அமைக்கப்படும் என்று அண்மையில் நிதிநிலை அறிக்கையின்போது அறிவிக்கப்பட்டது.​ இத்தகைய தனித்துறை அமைக்கப்படுவது இந்தியாவிலேயே தமிழகத்தில் முதலில் நடைபெறுகிறது.​ ​இதுநாள்வரை,​​ மாற்றுத்திறனாளிகள் தொடர்பான நடவடிக்கைகள் அனைத்தும் சமூக நலத் துறையின் கீழ்,​​ சமூக நல அமைச்சரின் பொறுப்பில் நடைபெற்று வந்தது.​ தற்போது முதல்வர் நேரடிப் பார்வையில் இத்துறை செயல்படும் என்றாலும்கூட,​​ இத்துறைக்கென தனி அமைச்சரை நியமித்தாலும் ஆச்சரியப்படுவதற்கில்லை.​ ஏனெனில் அதற்கான தேவை இருக்கிறது.​ ​இந்தியாவில் கடந்தமுறை எடுக்கப்பட்ட மக்கள்தொகைக் கணக்கெடுப்பு புள்ளிவிவரங்களின்படி 2.9 சதவீதம் பேர் மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகள்.​ தமிழ்நாட்டில் இவர்களின் எண்ணிக்கை 16.42 லட்சம்.​ அதாவது 2.6 சதவீதம்.​ இதில் மிகவும் சிக்கலானதும்,​​ முக்கியமானதும் என்னவென்றால்,​​ இவர்களில் 70 சதவீதம் பேர் கிராமங்களில் உள்ளனர்.​ நகர்ப்புறங்களில் உள்ள மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகள் மட்டுமே அரசின் நலத் திட்டங்களின் பயனைப் பெற முடிகிறது என்பதும்,​​ கிராமப்புறங்களில் உள்ள மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகள் அரசின் பயனையும் பெறாமல் கல்வியும் பெறமுடியாமல் மெல்ல மெல்ல காலவெள்ளத்தில் பின்தள்ளப்படுகிறார்கள்.​ மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகள் நல வாரியத்தில் 1.25 லட்சம் பேர் தங்களைப் பதிவு செய்துகொண்டுள்ளனர்.​ இவர்கள் மட்டுமே அரசின் பலன்களை பெறுகிறார்கள்.​ மற்றவர்கள் அரசின் நலத்திட்டம் பற்றிய விழிப்புணர்வே இல்லாமல் இருக்கின்றனர்.​ ​மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகள் நலத் திட்டத்துக்காக நடப்பு நிதிநிலை அறிக்கையில் ரூ.176 கோடி ஒதுக்கப்பட்டுள்ளது.​ இத்திட்டத்தில்,​​ மாணவர்களாக இருக்கும் மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகளின் உணவுப் படி ரூ.200 லிருந்து ரூ.450 ஆக உயர்த்தப்பட்டுள்ளது.​ ஆயினும்,​​ இன்னும் செய்யவேண்டியவை நிறைய இருக்கின்றன.​ அவற்றைச் செய்யும்போது இன்னும் நன்றாக இருக்கும்.உடற்குறையால்,​​ பார்வையிழப்பால்,​​ செவித்திறன் குறைவால் 40 சதவீதம் பாதிக்கப்பட்டோர்,​​ மூளைவளர்ச்சி குன்றியோர் ஆகியோரை மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகள் என்று வகைப்படுத்துகிறார்கள்.​ ஆனால்,​​ இவர்களுக்காக நடைபெறும் சிறப்புப் பள்ளிகளின் எண்ணிக்கை,​​ சிறப்புப் பயிற்சி பெற்ற ஆசிரியர் எண்ணிக்கையைக் கணக்கிட்டால்,​​ அவை தேவைக்குத் தகுந்தபடியாக இல்லை.இத்தகைய மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகளின் கல்விக்காக சில திட்டங்கள் இருந்தாலும்கூட,​​ இன்றைய நவீன உலகத்துடன் போட்டியிடும் வகையிலான தொழிற்கல்வி அளிக்கும் புதிய பயிற்சிகள் அரசு நிறுவனங்களில் கிடைப்பதில்லை.​ வழக்கமாக சொல்லித்தரும் அதே காலாவதியான அதே தொழிற்பயிற்சிகளைத்தான் அளிக்கின்றனர்.​ சில தனியார் அமைப்புகள்,​​ வெளிநாட்டு நிதியுதவியைக் கொண்டு அமைத்துள்ள,​​ மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகளுக்கான தொழிற்பயிற்சிக் கூடங்கள் ஆச்சரியத்தை தந்தாலும்,​​ அரசுத் தரப்பில் இத்தகைய முயற்சிகள் இதுவரை இல்லை என்பதே உண்மை.​ ​மாற்றுத் திறனாளி என்பவர் இரண்டு வகையிலும் பாதிக்கப்பட்டிருப்பவர்.​ அவரால் மற்றவர்களைப்போல செயல்பட முடியாது என்பது ஒரு பாதிப்பு.​ மற்றவர்களுக்கு இணையாகச் சம்பாதித்தாலும்,​​ தனது ஊனத்தை சரிக்கட்ட ஒரு தனிநபரை அமர்த்திக்கொள்ளும் கட்டாயம் இருப்பதால் அவரது வருமானத்தின் கணிசமான பகுதி அதற்காக செலவாகிப் போகிறது.​ ​மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகள் நலனுக்காக தன்னார்வ அமைப்புகள் நடத்தும் பகல்நேர மையம்,​​ உண்டுறைப் பள்ளி ஆகியவற்றுக்கு அரசு நிதியுதவி அளிப்பதுடன்,​​ மாற்றுத்திறனாளிகளின் தேவைக்கேற்றபடி கட்டடங்கள் கட்டுவதற்காக மானியம்கூட தருகிறது.​ ஆனால் மிகச் சில தன்னார்வத் தொண்டு நிறுவனங்கள் மட்டுமே உண்மையான தொண்டினை அளிக்கின்றன.​ மற்றவர்கள் அதிகாரிகளை கைக்குள் போட்டுக்கொண்டு,​​ வெறுமனே தலைகள் கணக்கைக் காட்டி சம்பாதிக்கின்றன என்பதுதான் நடைமுறை உண்மை.​ இத்தகைய மோசமான தன்னார்வத் ​ தொண்டு நிறுவனங்களின் பதிவை ரத்து செய்வதன் மூலம்,​​ ஓரளவு ஒழுங்கை நிலைநிறுத்த முடியும்.அரசு அலுவலகங்கள் மிகச் சிலவற்றில் மட்டுமே மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகளுக்காக சாய்தள மேடை அமைக்கப்பட்டிருக்கிறது.​ குறிப்பாக,​​ இத்தகைய சாய்தள வசதி கொண்ட பள்ளிகள் எத்தனை என்று கணக்கிட்டால்,​​ விரல்விட்டு எண்ணிவிடலாம்.விமான நிலையங்களில் மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகளுக்காக தனி கழிவறைகள் உள்ளன.​ அவை அவர்தம் ஊனத்தைக் கருத்தில் கொண்டு வடிவமைக்கப்பட்ட கழிப்பறைகள்.​ ஆனால் இத்தகைய கழிப்பறைகள் அரசு அலுவலகங்களிலோ அல்லது பள்ளிகளிலோ கிடையாது.​ உடற்குறை,​​ பார்வை குறையுள்ளவர்கள் மற்றவர் உதவியில்லாமல் இந்தக் கழிவறையைப் பயன்படுத்த முடியாது.​ கழிவறையில் உட்கார்ந்தபின் ஊன்றி எழுவதற்கு ஏதுவாக,​​ சுவரில் கம்பிகள் பொருத்தப்பட்ட கழிவறைகளே இல்லை.​ பேருந்துகளில்கூட ஊனமுற்றவருக்காக ஒரு இருக்கை உள்ளதே தவிர,​​ அந்த இருக்கை சாதாரண மனிதர் அமரும் அதே இருக்கைதான்,​​ 40 சதவீத உடற்குறை உள்ளவர் இந்த இருக்கையில் அமர்ந்து எழ முடியாது.​ ​மூளை வளர்ச்சி குன்றியவர்கள் நீங்கலாக,​​ மற்ற மூன்று வகைகளில் பாதிப்புகள் கொண்ட மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகள் தங்களுக்கான ஊதியத்தை சம்பாதிக்க ஒரு வாய்ப்பை ஏற்படுத்தித்தர அரசினால் முடியும்.​ மகளிர் சுயஉதவிக் குழுக்கள் போலவே,​​ மாற்றுத்திறனாளிகள் சுயஉதவிக் குழுக்களை ஏற்படுத்தலாம்.​ இவர்தம் திறமைக்கேற்ப அரசுத்துறை வேலைகளையே அயல்பணி ஒப்பந்தமாக செய்துகொள்ள முடியும்.​ மேலும்,​​ கோயில்களில் காலணி பாதுகாத்தல்,​​ பஸ்நிலையங்களில் சைக்கிள் ஸ்டாண்டுகள்,​​ பேருந்து நிலையங்களில் ஓய்வறை நிர்வாகம்,​​ பொருள் வைப்பு நிர்வாகம் ஆகியவற்றை இத்தகைய மாற்றுத்திறனாளிகள் சுயஉதவிக் குழுக்களுக்கு மட்டுமே வழங்கினால்,​​ அவர்கள் பொருளாதார ரீதியில் தங்களை மேம்படுத்திக்கொள்ள உதவியாக அமையும்.

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கோவை உலகத் தமிழ் செம்மொழி மாநாட்டுக்கு பேரணியாகச் செல்லும் மாற்றுத் திறனாளிகள்

handicap1

கோவையில் நடைபெறவுள்ள உலகத் தமிழ்ச் செம்மொழி மாநாட்டில் பங்கேற்பதற்காக மதுரையைச் சேர்ந்த 50 மாற்றுத்திறனாளிகள் மூன்று சக்கர வாகனங்களில் ஜூன் 16-ம் தேதி பேரணியாக செல்லவுள்ளனர்.   இந்தப் பேரணிக்கு அனுமதியளிக்கக் கோரி மதுரை மாவட்ட ஆட்சியர் சி.காமராஜிடம் வெள்ளிக்கிழமை அனுமதி கோரி மனு அளித்தனர்.  மனிதநேய மாற்றுத்திறனாளிகள் மறுவாழ்வு மையம் மற்றும் ஏஐஎம் கிராம வளர்ச்சிநிறுவனமும் இந்தப் பேரணிக்கான ஏற்பாடுகளைச் செய்துள்ளது.   ஜூன் 16-ம் தேதி மதுரை காந்தி மியூசியத்தில் இருந்து தொடங்கும் இந்தப் பேரணி வாடிப்பட்டி, கொடைரோடு, செம்பட்டி, கன்னிவாடி, ஒட்டன்சத்திரம், தாராபுரம், பல்லடம் வழியாக ஜூன் 21-ம் தேதி அதிகாலை கோவையைச் சென்றடையும்.   இதுகுறித்து மனிதநேய மாற்றுத்திறனாளிகளின் மறுவாழ்வு மையத்தைச் சேர்ந்த நிர்வாகி அசரப் கூறியது:  திமுக ஆட்சியில் மாற்றுத்திறனாளிகளின் மேம்பாட்டுக்காக பல வகையில் ஆக்கமும், ஊக்கமும் அளிக்கப்பட்டு வருகிறது. முதல்வர் கருணாநிதி முயற்சியால் நடத்தப்படும் உலகத் தமிழ் செம்மொழி மாநாடு வெற்றி பெற வேண்டும் என்ற நோக்கத்தில்தான் இந்தப் பேரணிக்கு ஏற்பாடு செய்துள்ளோம்.   இதில் 50 மாற்றுத்திறனாளிகள் தங்களது மூன்று சக்கர சைக்கிளில் செல்ல உள்ளனர். மாவட்ட ஆட்சியர் சி.காமராஜ் இந்தப் பேரணியைத் தொடக்கி வைக்கவுள்ளார். மாநகர் போலீஸ் கமிஷனர் பி.பாலசுப்பிரமணியன் தலைமை வகிக்கிறார். மதுரை மாநகராட்சி வடக்கு மண்டலத் தலைவர் க.இசக்கிமுத்து உள்ளிட்டோர் பங்கேற்கின்றனர்.

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Disability Discrimination Act

T H E  D I S A B I L I T Y  D I S C R I M I N AT I O N  A C T ( 1 9 9 2 ) (D D A)

prohibits discrimination, including indirect discrimination and harassment, on the basis of disability

  • enables complaints to be lodged by or on behalf of a person who believes there has been discrimination on the basis of having a disability or of being an associate of a person with a disability
  • enables representative complaints to be lodged on behalf of a class of people with a disability, or associates of people with a disability, who are believed to be discriminated against
  • creates the position of Disability Discrimination Commissioner to investigate and conciliate complaints
  • enables the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission to conduct inquiries into complaints which are unable to be conciliated or which are considered unsuitable for conciliation
  • enables the Commission to make a decision about an appropriate remedy where a complaint is found to be substantiated
  • enables the development of Disability Standards
  • makes it unlawful to breach Disability Standards
  • enables the development of Action Plans to further the objects of the Act and which may be taken into account in proceedings under the Act
  • creates a number of offences under the Act, in particular victimisation
  • gives the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission other functions to further the objects of the Act Introduction

    Introduction

    While legislation exists in Equal Employment Opportunity areas which prohibits discrimination in employment against people with disabilities, the Federal Disability Discrimination Act 1992 makes it unlawful to treat people with a disability less favourably than people without a disability in the areas of:

  • employment

  • education

  • access

  • provision of goods

  • services and facilities

  • accommodation

  • buying land

  • clubs and associations

  • sport

  • administration of Commonwealth Government laws and programs

    What is a disability?

    The definition of disability includes a disability:

  • that exists

  • that previously existed but no longer exists

  • that may exist in the future

  • that is thought to exist, is imputed

Included in the definition of a “disability” are:

  • physical

  • intellectual

  • psychiatric

  • sensory

  • neurological

  • learning

  • physical disfigurement

  • the presence in the body of disease causing organisms.

Those discriminated against may include:

  • a person who has a legally defined disability

  • a person who is an associate of a person who has a disability

This includes:

  • a spouse

  • a cohabitee

  • a relative

  • a carer

  • a person in a business sporting or recreational relationship with a person with a disability

Specific Areas under the Act

Access

People with a disability have a right to have access to places used by the public.

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) makes it against the law for public places to be made inaccessible to people with a disability.

Places used by the public include:

  • public footpaths and walkways

  • educational institutions

  • shops and department stores

  • banks

  • credit unions

  • building societies

  • parks

  • public swimming pools

  • public toilets and pedestrian malls

  • cafes

  • restaurants

  • hotels

  • theatres and other places of entertainment

  • lawyers

  • offices and legal services

  • libraries

  • sporting venues

  • social and sporting clubs

  • government offices

  • public transport including trains, buses, ferries, boats, ships and planes

  • dentists and doctors surgeries

  • hospitals

  • hairdressers and beauty salons

  • travel agents

  • government-run services

Access applies to existing places as well as places under construction. Existing places must be modified and be accessible (except where this would involve “unjustifiable hardship”).

Every area open to the public should be open to a person with a disability. He/she should expect to enter and make use of places used by the public if people without a disability can do so, for example:

  • places used by the public should be accessible at the entrance and inside
  • facilities should also be accessible (wheelchair-accessible toilets, lift buttons within reach, tactile and audible lift signals)
  • rather than being confined to a segregated space or the worst seats, all areas within places used by the public should be accessible to people with a disability

Access to all places used by the public will not happen overnight. It is likely that some changes will be easier and quicker than others:

  • kerb cuts, sound signals at pedestrian lights and talking Iifts are likely to happen more quickly than replacing inaccessible buses and train carriages

Examples of changes which have taken place at the request of people with a disability include:

a local council built footpath ramps, altered stairs, widened some paths and relocated post boxes and traffic signs to create access to three local shop
a ramp was installed at the front door of a bank to help a local customer independently conduct business furniture in a college canteen was rearranged to enable a student easier access and gave an improved traffic flow for everyone

While changes may not occur rapidly, they can be expected. People with a disability have every right to complain when they are discriminated against because a place is inaccessible to them.

Buying goods and using a service

People with a disability have a right to obtain goods and use services in the same way as people without a disability.

This includes goods, services and facilities from:

  • shops and department stores

  • cafes, restaurants, hotels

  • theatres and other places of entertainment

  • banks, credit unions, building societies

  • lawyers and legal services

  • sports and social clubs

  • swimming pools

  • public transport

  • travel agents

  • dentists, doctors, and hospitals

  • hairdressers and beauty salons

  • government-run services

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) makes it against the law for providers of goods, services and facilities to discriminate against a person with a disability because of their disability.

This means that providers of goods, services and facilities cannot:

  • refuse to provide a person with a disability with goods, services and facilities

For example, he/she cannot be refused service in a restaurant because they have a guide dog with them; or cannot be refused hospital treatment because they are HIV positive.

  • provide goods, services and facilities on less favourable terms and conditions

For example, charging more for a taxi because he/she uses a wheelchair; not providing a TTY line for deaf people to contact emergency services.

  • provide the goods, services and facilities in an unfair manner

For example, making insulting remarks while serving the person with a disability; serving him/her after everyone else has been served.

It also means that a person with a disability has a right to enter the premises of providers of goods, services and facilities if people without a disability can do so.

Accommodation

A person with a disability has a right to obtain accommodation in the same way as people without a disability. This includes renting a flat, house, unit, or a room in a boarding house, hotel or motel.

The Disability Discrimination Act (1992) (DDA) makes it against the law for real estate agents, landlords or landladies and other providers of accommodation to discriminate against a person because of their disability.

This means that providers of accommodation cannot:

  • refuse an application for accommodation because a person has a disability.

  • provide accommodation for a person with a disability on less favourable terms and conditions.

For example, giving such person the least attractive room in the hotel or not allowing them to keep their guide dog in their flat.

  • put their application on the bottom of the list.

For example, giving their application a lower priority because it is assumed they will be a less stable tenant.

For More Details:http://www.openroad.net.au/access/dakit/disaware/handout7.htm

T H E  D I S A B I L I T Y  D I S C R I M I N AT I O N
A C T ( 1 9 9 2 ) (D D A)

  • prohibits discrimination, including indirect discrimination and harassment, on the basis of disability
  • enables complaints to be lodged by or on behalf of a person who believes there has been discrimination on the basis of having a disability or of being an associate of a person with a disability
  • enables representative complaints to be lodged on behalf of a class of people with a disability, or associates of people with a disability, who are believed to be discriminated against
  • creates the position of Disability Discrimination Commissioner to investigate and conciliate complaints
  • enables the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission to conduct inquiries into complaints which are unable to be conciliated or which are considered unsuitable for conciliation
  • enables the Commission to make a decision about an appropriate remedy where a complaint is found to be substantiated
  • enables the development of Disability Standards
  • makes it unlawful to breach Disability Standards
  • enables the development of Action Plans to further the objects of the Act and which may be taken into account in proceedings under the Act
  • creates a number of offences under the Act, in particular victimisation
  • gives the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission other functions to further the objects of the Act Introduction

Introduction

While legislation exists in Equal Employment Opportunity areas which prohibits discrimination in employment against people with disabilities, the Federal Disability Discrimination Act 1992 makes it unlawful to treat people with a disability less favourably than people without a disability in the areas of:

  • employment

  • education

  • access

  • provision of goods

  • services and facilities

  • accommodation

  • buying land

  • clubs and associations

  • sport

  • administration of Commonwealth Government laws and programs

What is a disability?

The definition of disability includes a disability:

  • that exists

  • that previously existed but no longer exists

  • that may exist in the future

  • that is thought to exist, is imputed

Included in the definition of a “disability” are:

  • physical

  • intellectual

  • psychiatric

  • sensory

  • neurological

  • learning

  • physical disfigurement

  • the presence in the body of disease causing organisms.

Those discriminated against may include:

  • a person who has a legally defined disability

  • a person who is an associate of a person who has a disability

This includes:

  • a spouse

  • a cohabitee

  • a relative

  • a carer

  • a person in a business sporting or recreational relationship with a person with a disability

Specific Areas under the Act

Access

People with a disability have a right to have access to places used by the public.

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) makes it against the law for public places to be made inaccessible to people with a disability.

Places used by the public include:

  • public footpaths and walkways

  • educational institutions

  • shops and department stores

  • banks

  • credit unions

  • building societies

  • parks

  • public swimming pools

  • public toilets and pedestrian malls

  • cafes

  • restaurants

  • hotels

  • theatres and other places of entertainment

  • lawyers

  • offices and legal services

  • libraries

  • sporting venues

  • social and sporting clubs

  • government offices

  • public transport including trains, buses, ferries, boats, ships and planes

  • dentists and doctors surgeries

  • hospitals

  • hairdressers and beauty salons

  • travel agents

  • government-run services

Access applies to existing places as well as places under construction. Existing places must be modified and be accessible (except where this would involve “unjustifiable hardship”).

Every area open to the public should be open to a person with a disability. He/she should expect to enter and make use of places used by the public if people without a disability can do so, for example:

  • places used by the public should be accessible at the entrance and inside
  • facilities should also be accessible (wheelchair-accessible toilets, lift buttons within reach, tactile and audible lift signals)
  • rather than being confined to a segregated space or the worst seats, all areas within places used by the public should be accessible to people with a disability

Access to all places used by the public will not happen overnight. It is likely that some changes will be easier and quicker than others:

  • kerb cuts, sound signals at pedestrian lights and talking Iifts are likely to happen more quickly than replacing inaccessible buses and train carriages

Examples of changes which have taken place at the request of people with a disability include:

a local council built footpath ramps, altered stairs, widened some paths and relocated post boxes and traffic signs to create access to three local shop
a ramp was installed at the front door of a bank to help a local customer independently conduct business furniture in a college canteen was rearranged to enable a student easier access and gave an improved traffic flow for everyoneWhile changes may not occur rapidly, they can be expected. People with a disability have every right to complain when they are discriminated against because a place is inaccessible to them.

Buying goods and using a service

People with a disability have a right to obtain goods and use services in the same way as people without a disability.

This includes goods, services and facilities from:

  • shops and department stores

  • cafes, restaurants, hotels

  • theatres and other places of entertainment

  • banks, credit unions, building societies

  • lawyers and legal services

  • sports and social clubs

  • swimming pools

  • public transport

  • travel agents

  • dentists, doctors, and hospitals

  • hairdressers and beauty salons

  • government-run services

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) makes it against the law for providers of goods, services and facilities to discriminate against a person with a disability because of their disability.

This means that providers of goods, services and facilities cannot:

  • refuse to provide a person with a disability with goods, services and facilities

For example, he/she cannot be refused service in a restaurant because they have a guide dog with them; or cannot be refused hospital treatment because they are HIV positive.

  • provide goods, services and facilities on less favourable terms and conditions

For example, charging more for a taxi because he/she uses a wheelchair; not providing a TTY line for deaf people to contact emergency services.

  • provide the goods, services and facilities in an unfair manner

For example, making insulting remarks while serving the person with a disability; serving him/her after everyone else has been served.

It also means that a person with a disability has a right to enter the premises of providers of goods, services and facilities if people without a disability can do so.

Accommodation

A person with a disability has a right to obtain accommodation in the same way as people without a disability. This includes renting a flat, house, unit, or a room in a boarding house, hotel or motel.

The Disability Discrimination Act (1992) (DDA) makes it against the law for real estate agents, landlords or landladies and other providers of accommodation to discriminate against a person because of their disability.

This means that providers of accommodation cannot:

  • refuse an application for accommodation because a person has a disability.

  • provide accommodation for a person with a disability on less favourable terms and conditions.

For example, giving such person the least attractive room in the hotel or not allowing them to keep their guide dog in their flat.

  • put their application on the bottom of the list.

For example, giving their application a lower priority because it is assumed they will be a less stable tenant.

Buying land

A person with a disability has a right to buy land or property in the same way as people without a disability.

The Disability Discrimination Act (1992) (DDA) makes it against the law for a real estate agent, land owner or other land and property agents to discriminate against a person because of their disability or the disability of their associates.

This means that an agent or land owner cannot:

  • refuse to sell a person with a disability land or property

For example, refusing to sell a person a house because neighbours object to their disability or the disability of people they are buying the house for; or residents in a block of units refusing to sell a unit to a person because of their disability.

  • offer a person with a disability land or property on less favourable terms and conditions

For example, offering to sell the land at a higher price.

Sport

People with a disability have a right to take part in sporting activities in the same way as people without a disability.

This means they must not be excluded from playing a sport if they are:

  • capable of playing the sport, or

  • selected to play the sport on the basis of their skills and abilities

Such members of the community should also not be excluded from any administrative or coaching activities associated with the sport.

For example, if they have the necessary skills to play cricket or swim competitively, they cannot be excluded because they have asthma or are deaf.

Clubs and associations

People with a disability have a right to be a member of a club or association in the same way as a person without a disability.

This includes sporting, social and licensed clubs, drama or music groups, political parties, business associations and self-help groups.

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) makes it against the law for clubs and associations to discriminate against a person because of their disability.

This means clubs and associations cannot:

  • refuse to accept an application for membership

  • provide membership on less favourable terms and conditions

For example, a club may want to offer part membership or charge more for membership.

  • limit access to the benefits and activities offered by the club or association

For example, restricting the activities or the hours a person with a disability can use the club.

The Act also means that clubs and associations should provide adequate access to premises and facilities for people with a disability.

Employment

A person with a disability has a right to the same employment opportunities as people without a disability.

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) makes it against the law for an employer to discriminate against a person because of their disability.

Employers must offer equal employment opportunities to everyone. This means that if a person with a disability can do the essential activities or “inherent requirements” of a job, they should have just as much chance to do that job as anyone else.

For example, an essential activity or an “inherent requirement” for a telephonist’s job is the ability to communicate by telephone. But it is not an “inherent requirement” to hold the phone in the hand.

Employers should choose the best person for the job, whether they have a disability or not. They should make this decision based on a person’s ability to perform the essential activities of the job. They should not make assumptions about what a person can or cannot do because of their disability.

Protection exists against discrimination in:

  • recruitment processes such as advertising, interviewing and other selection processes

  • decisions on who will get the job

  • the terms and conditions of employment such as pay rates, work hours and leave

  • promotion, transfer, training or other benefits associated with employment

  • dismissal or any other detriment such as demotion or retrenchment

The DDA also covers contract work and membership of partnerships of three or more people, as well as discrimination by:

  • bodies with control over professional, trade or occupational qualifications

  • federally registered trade union

  • employment agencies

For example, it is unlawful for an employment agency not to refer a person to a job because of their disability, if they can do the essential activities or “inherent requirements” of the job.

Workplace changes

If a person with a disability is the best person for the job, then the employer must make workplace changes or “reasonable adjustments” if they need them to perform the essential activities of the job.

In most cases they will be able to tell the employer what they need. If necessary, employers should also seek advice from government agencies or organisations which represent or provide services to people with a disability.

“Reasonable adjustments” may include:

  • changing recruitment and selection procedures

For example, providing a sign language interpreter for a deaf person or ensuring the medical assessor is familiar with a person’s particular disability and how it relates to the job requirements.

  • modifying work premises

For example, making ramps, modifying toilets or providing flashing lights to alert people with a hearing loss.

  • changes to job design, work schedules or other work practices

For example, swapping some duties among staff or regular meal breaks for a person with diabetes.

  • modifying equipment

For example, lowering a workbench or providing an enlarged computer screen.

  • providing training or other assistance

For example, induction programs for staff with a disability and co-workers, mentor or support person for a person with an intellectual disability, including staff with a disability, in all mainstream training.

If employers say changes are too difficult, the DDA does not require workplace changes to be made if this will cause major difficulties or will cost too much for a person or organisation. This is called “unjustifiable hardship”.

But before they can claim adjustments are unjustified, employers need to:

  • thoroughly consider how an adjustment might be made

  • discuss this directly with the person with a disability

  • consult relevant sources of advice

It is up to the employer to show that adjustments are unjustified.

Education

A person with a disability has a right to study at any educational institution in the same way as any other student.

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) makes it against the law for an educational authority to discriminate against a person because of their disability.

This includes all public and private educational institutions, primary and secondary schools and tertiary institutions such as TAFE, private colleges and universities.

Educators must offer a person with a disability the same educational opportunities as everyone else. This means that if they meet the necessary entry requirements of a school or college, or they can do the essential course-work, they should have just as much chance to study as anyone else.

Educators must base their decisions on a person’s ability to meet the essential requirements of the institution or course. They should not make assumptions about what a person can or cannot do because of their disability.

The DDA protects against discrimination in education in the following areas:

A D M I S S I O N

  • refusal or failure to accept an application for admission as a student

  • accepting a person with a disability as a student on less favourable terms or conditions than others

For example, asking a person with a disability to pay higher fees.

A C C E S S

  • denying or limiting access

For example, not being allowed to attend excursions or join in school sports; lectures delivered in an inaccessible format; inaccessible student common rooms.

  • expelling a person because of their disability

  • subjecting a person with a disability to any other detriment

  • harassment

  • comments or actions made about a person’s disability, such as insults or humiliating jokes

  • comments or actions which create a hostile environment

Government services

The Federal Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) makes disability discrimination against the law in many areas of life.

This means that all governments in Australia – Commonwealth, state, territory and local government – have responsibilities under the DDA in other areas such as employment, education, access to premises and the provision of goods, services and facilities.

In every area of the administration of Commonwealth laws or programs it is against the law for any government body to treat you less fairly than a person without a disability.

This includes:

  • access to places where Commonwealth programs are being run

  • access to benefits to which people are entitled

  • equal access to information about Commonwealth law

  • access to voting places, facilities and information

  • access to court buildings

Making a complaint

If people are discriminated against because of their disability, they can get confidential advice from or make a formal complaint to the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission.

Complaints can be made by:

the person who has been discriminated against

a person affected by discrimination – on his or her own behalf and on behalf of others affected in the same way

a person on behalf of another person or other people who have been discriminated against (for example, an advocate)

an organisation on behalf of a person or other people who have been discriminated against (for example, a trade union)

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Assisting people with a disability



Some of the most difficult barriers people with disabilities face are the negative attitudes and perceptions of other people. Sometimes those attitudes are just unconscious misconceptions that result in impolite or thoughtless acts by otherwise well-meaning people.

General suggestions

Don’t assume people with disabilities need your help. Ask before acting.

Make eye contact and speak directly to the person, not through their companion.

Avoid actions and words that suggest the person should be treated differently. It is alright to invite a person in a wheelchair to “go for a walk” or to ask a blind person if she “sees what you mean.”

Treat people with disabilities with the same respect and consideration that you have for everyone else.

Make basic information available in accessible formats: large print, Braille and electronic formats.

Offer a guided tour of any relevant facilities so that people with disabilities can familiarise themselves with the appropriate layout. The orientation also should identify any potential obstacles and all emergency exits.

For specific disabilities

V I S U A L  I M PA I R M E N TS

Be descriptive. You may have to help orientate people with visual impairments and let them know what is coming up. If they are walking, tell them if they have to step up or down, let them know if the door is to their right or left and warn them of possible hazards.

You do not have to speak loudly to people with visual impairments. Most of them can hear perfectly well.

Offer to read written information for a person with a visual impairment, when appropriate.

If you are asked to guide a person with a visual impairment, offer your arm instead of grabbing theirs.

H E A R I N G   I M PA I R M E N TS

Face people with hearing impairments when you talk to them so they can see your lips.

Slow the rate at which you speak when talking to a person with a hearing impairment.

Increase the level of your voice.

Communicate in writing, if necessary.

P H Y S I C A L   I M PA I R M E N T S

Try sitting or crouching down to the approximate height of people in wheelchairs or scooters when you talk to them.

Do not lean on a person’s wheelchair unless you have their permission – it is their personal space.

Be aware of what is accessible and what is not accessible to people in wheelchairs.

Give a push only when asked.

I N T E L L E C T U A L  D I S A B I L I T I E S

Do not assume the person is not listening just because you are getting no verbal or visual feedback. Ask whether he/she understands or agrees.

Do not assume you have to explain everything to people with intellectual disabilities. They do not necessarily have a problem with general comprehension.

Offer to read written material aloud, when necessary.